AT NIAGARA FALLS

Robert Rudd had been in New York more than once, and he therefore had no difficulty in finding out the fine hotel on Broadway known as the St. Nicholas. He entered it, and, walking up to the desk, inquired, “Is Mr. John Fitzgerald staying here?” “Yes,” answered the clerk. “Do you wish to see him?” “If you please.” “Then write your name on a card and I will send it…

WHAT THE LETTER CONTAINED

Carden had not the least suspicion that he was observed. The Tarbox farm-house stood rather aloof from the village, and the barn, as we have already stated, was at some distance from the house. He worked away calmly, feeling that there was no danger of his being interfered with. At last he reached the box, and stooping lifted it complacently. Mr. Tarbox became very much agitated when he saw his…

A FARCE AND A TRAGEDY

The circus was nearing the close of its stay in Crampton. Of course, though it was a large town, it was not large enough to warrant the show in staying so long, but for the large number of visitors who were attracted from neighboring towns. Both by rail and by carriages of all sorts, from farmers’ wagons to top buggies and carryalls, hundreds of people flocked to see the wonders…

AN ATHLETIC CONTEST.

Carden, the canvas man, though discharged from the circus, did not leave town. He hoped to be reinstated in his old position, and made a personal appeal to the manager. But the latter returned a decided negative. “Don’t I do my work well?” asked Carden. “I have no fault to find with you on that score.” “Then why do you discharge me?” “You know well enough.” “Is it because that…

A COMPACT

We must now change the scene to a fine estate in the interior of New York State, near one of the beautiful lakes which give such a charm to the surrounding landscape. The estate was a large one, laid out in the English style, with a fine mansion centrally located and elegantly furnished. Surely the owner of this fine domain was worthy of envy, and ought to have been happy.…

THE CANVAS MAN

When Mr. Tarbox came to understand how he had been hoaxed by the boys he was furious, but his anger was ineffectual, for there seemed no way in which he could retaliate. He had had his opportunity in the woods, but that had passed, and was not likely to come again. Meanwhile he found it hard to bear the jocose inquiries of his neighbors touching his encounter with the “tiger.”…

TRAPPED.

Robert foresaw that trouble was in store for him, as he had seen enough of the farmer to understand his disposition. However, the boy was not easily startled, nor was he of a nervous temperament. He looked calmly at Tarbox and said: “Very well, sir, what do you want of me?” “What do I want of you? I shouldn’t think you’d need to be told. You remember me, don’t you?”…

TWO BOYS ON A TRAMP

When Robert left the ring, the old man sank back into his seat, and his interest in the performance ceased. For some reason his nephew also was anxious to leave the tent. “Uncle,” he said, “hadn’t we better go back to the hotel? It will be too fatiguing for you to remain here all the evening.” “Will that boy ride again?” asked Mr. Richmond, eagerly. “No, he is not to…

THE EVENING ENTERTAINMENT

The performance had not commenced—indeed, half an hour would elapse before the hour fixed—and several of the performers were to be seen among the spectators about the cages of the animals. One of these Tarbox recognized. “Look at that boy!” he said, clutching the constable’s arm. He pointed to Robert Rudd and Charlie Davis, the two young riders, who were walking together. “What of him?” asked Spriggins. “That’s the young…

THE CONSTABLE GO TO THE CIRCUS

Ezekiel Price, justice of the peace, generally known as Squire Price, was just rising from his supper table when the one maid of all work, Bridget, entered and said: “Mr. Price, old Tarbox is at the door and wishes to see you.” “Old Tarbox!” repeated the squire in a tone of reproof. “Really, you should speak more respectfully of Mr. Nathan Tarbox.” “Everybody calls him old Tarbox,” said Bridget, “and…